Pin it!
Google Plus

Do You Measure Up?

  • Lesson
6-8
1
Measurement
Katie Carbone
Location: unknown

Students learn the basics of the metric system. They identify which units of measurement are used to measure specific objects, and they learn to convert between units within the same system.

Provide students with index cards and markers. Have them brainstorm different measures used in the metric system and record them on index cards.

In pairs, have the students organize the index cards into categories of weight, length, and volume. Ask the students to rank each unit within the category according to size (smallest to largest).

A sample chart appears below.

Length
 
Mass
 
Volume
 
millimeter
 
milligram
 
milliliter
 
centimeter
 
gram
 
liter
 
meter
 
kilogram
 
 
 
kilometer
 
 
 
 
 

Next, have the students generate a list of items measured with each unit. Place each item on a separate index card and distribute the cards among the class.

A sample list is shown below.

Length
 
Mass
 
Volume
 
millimeter
insect lengths
 
milligram
medicines
 
milliliter
medicine dosage
 
centimeter
length of paper
 
gram
food
 
liter
milk
 
meter
length of a hallway
 
kilogram
mass of humans
 
 
 
kilometer
distance between cities
 
 
 
 
 

After the students are familiar with the different sizes of the metric units, show them a conversion table. Facilitate a conversion with students on how to convert by multiplying and dividing by powers of ten.

Distribute the Metric Conversions activity sheet to the students to work on individually or in pairs.

pdficon 

Metric Conversions Activity Sheet

Assessments 

  1. At this stage of the unit, students should be able to do the following:
    • Identify the appropriate unit of measure for familiar objects and distances
    • Make conversions between units of measure in metric units
  2. Tell students to create a series of problems, using the metric system, that they can exchange with each other. Include with each problem an open-ended response question that measures the students' understanding of the metric measure and its application.
 

Questions for Students 

1. What kind of metric units are used to measure fruit at the grocery store?

[Mass of fruit: grams.]

2. What is the smallest unit of the metric system that you might use to measure length? What is the largest?

[Millimeter; Kilometer.]

3. How is volume measured in the metric system? Where have you seen this unit on everyday products?

[Liter is the base unit; bottles of water.]

4. Where are some common places you have seen the metric system used instead of customary units?

[Student responses may vary.]

Teacher Reflection 

  • Did the students demonstrate an understanding of metric measures? What additional experiences do they need before moving on to the next lesson?
  • Did students apply metric measures correctly? In what areas did they demonstrate confusion about appropriate units for specific tasks?
  • What additional experiences do the students need in converting units between customary and metric measures? What additional activities can reinforce this lesson?
 
1657icon
Measurement

Measuring Up: Measurement Terms

6-8
This lesson introduces relationships between measurement and geometry. The activities build on students' prior knowledge as students work with partners and as a whole class to identify and classify terms to develop their understanding of measurement.
1658icon
Measurement

The Golden Ratio

6-8
Students learn about ratios, including the “Golden Ratio”, a ratio of length to width that can be found in art, architecture, and nature. Students examine different ratios to determine whether the Golden Ratio can be found in the human body.
1660icon

What's Your Rate?

Students learn to write and solve proportions by gathering data and calculating unit rates.
1666icon
Measurement

Discovering Gallon Man

6-8
Students experiment with units of liquid measure used in the customary system of measurement. They practice making volume conversions in the customary system.
1672icon
Measurement

In Your Shadow

6-8
Students extend their knowledge of proportions to solving problems dealing with similarity. They measure the heights and shadows of familiar objects and use indirect measurement to find the heights of things that are much bigger in size, such as a flagpole, a school building, or a tree.
1675icon
Measurement

Off the Scale

6-8
Students use real-world examples to solve problems involving scale as they examine maps of their home states and calculate distances between cities.

Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Identify the appropriate unit of measure for familiar objects and distances
  • Make conversions between units of measure in metric units